By Joey Asher

Category: Q&A

On the classic game show “Name that Tune”, contestants would compete to name a popular song in as few a notes a possible.  We’d like to see a business world version of that game called “Answer that Question.” In this game, contestants must answer the question in as few sentences as possible.

In general, shorter answers are better than longer ones.  Shorter answers are easier to understand, help the audience faster, and inspire confidence.

We do a drill with our clients where we have them answer questions in a single sentence.  This is not to say that you should always give one-sentence answers. But it’s a drill that helps teach how to keep answers tight and listener-friendly.

Here’s an example:

Question: “Why are we having such a tough time closing this sale?”

Answer that is too long:  “If you think back to how we first got this contact, the key decision-maker was most interested in a program that would ensure their sales people had all their training in five months.  Now we started creating this training six months ago and we’re still working on coming up with a program.  Meanwhile . . .”

Answer that is nice and tight: “We haven’t been able to close this sale because we haven’t been able to show the final training schedule to the client. . . .”

The first answer comes off as rambling and makes the answerer seem uncertain.  The second answer gets right to the point and inspires confidence.

Once you get the basic answer out in a sentence or two, then you can explain if necessary.

If you want to learn how to answer questions well, think of it as a game show called “Answer that Question.”  To win, you need to answer in as few sentences as possible.

 ©Wickedgood | Dreamstime.com / Women Thinking

Speechworks is a communication and selling skills coaching firm. We teach professionals how to craft and deliver complex messages in a simple, persuasive manner. Since 1986, through workshops and one-on-one instruction, we have helped countless individuals become better presenters and communicators. You can reach us at 404.266.0888, speech@speechworks.net or on the web at www.speechworks.net

Recent Posts

Aug2019

The Entrepreneur’s Secret: Why a Perfect Pitch isn’t Just About Ideas

By: Julie Lindsay, Speechworks Category: Practice It’s all about the shoes. That’s Charlie Lehman’s secret ingredient for stepping into success with his startup company Convex Minds. Lehman, a former U.S. Navy officer, is familiar [...]

Jul2019

Got Nerves? How to De-Stress and Power Through that Presentation!

By: Julie Lindsay, Speechworks Category: Nerves Welcome to the Speechworks newsletter! This month we’re focusing on nerves, a topic that’s close the heart of most public speakers. Nerves can get your heart pounding and [...]

Jun2019

How Training “Millennials” Benefits the Entire Workforce: An Interview with Talent Development Expert Travis Dommert

By: Julie Lindsay, Speechworks Category: Other An estimated 10,000 baby boomers leave the workforce every day. Current projections show millennials will make up 75% of the workforce by 2025. It’s a sea change that [...]